Reah's Blog | Education, Language, Technology

Congratulations to the New Professional Teachers!

By on Nov 27, 2012 in Education | 2 comments

Congratulations September 2012 LET passers! The more teachers the Philippines have the merrier! And I want to thank you for letting me be part of your journey to achieve your dreams. It is a heartwarming experience. Now, let’s take this road together in educating fellow Filipinos!    

10 Good Books to Read for Teachers

By on Jul 13, 2012 in Education | 0 comments

The following article is a guest post from Ryan De Guzman, a fellow writer and colleague. Visit his own blog Nevermore Nonsense to read more of his posts. Admit it, shaping the minds of the children is one of the highest calling there is. It is the enormous responsibility teachers are bearing in the classroom daily. And since big jobs demand big relaxations, here are seven of the best books that pay tribute to that profession; best enjoyed on those weekend breaks from the class. The Freedom Writers Diary: How a Teacher and 150 Teens Used Writing to Change Themselves and the World Around Them. (The Freedom Writers, 1999) A non-fiction authored by The Freedom Writers, a group of students from Woodrow Wilson High School in Long Beach, California, and their teacher, Erin Gruwell. Everything started when Gruwell first met her band of “unteachable, at-risk” students, and next is...

10 Modern Philosophers and their Contribution to Education

By on Jul 10, 2012 in Education | 43 comments

The following article is a guest post from Ryan De Guzman, a fellow writer and colleague. Visit his own blog Nevermore Nonsense to read more of his posts. Two and a half millenniums ago, Plato stated that knowledge is justified true belief, an influential notion that shaped educational theories across time. Since then, modern thinkers had never stopped seeking knowledge about the human psychology, development, and education. Here, are the ten greatest. John Locke and the Tabula Rasa Locke (1632-1704), an English philosopher and physician, proposed that the mind was a blank slate or  tabula rasa. This states that men are born without innate ideas, and that knowledge comes from experience and perception, as opposed to predetermined good and evil nature, as believed by other thinkers. On his treatise “Some Thoughts Concerning Education”, he emphasized that the knowledge taught during...

Use Images and Charts to Learn Descriptive Words

By on Sep 6, 2011 in Education, English Language | 5 comments

Growing up, I had a limited English word list to describe emotions, actions, or even people in certain ways. During the past three years, however, I’ve been adding new adjectives to my list more actively than before. One of the ways I’ve been doing to learn new adjectives is using images and charts. Back when I was in high school in the Philippines, I looked at a facial expression chart posted inside our guidance counselor’s office. Drawn in the chart were faces showing different emotions, and below each face was the English word to describe the expression. I didn’t think of learning words from the chart that time. I just thought it was creative and cool. Now, I think of it as a learning tool as well. Using the facial expression chart as a learning tool was probably the primary intention of the first person who created a chart like this. And it’s good that...

Use an English Visual Dictionary When Learning Nouns

By on Sep 5, 2011 in Education, English Language | 0 comments

When learning new English nouns—the words that refer to people, places, things, or ideas—a visual dictionary will help you retain the words in your mind effectively. It’s just like when a child learns what the word apple means, a parent will show the child an apple or an image of an apple to help the child create a mental image of an apple, which is usually a red fruit (sometimes it’s green!). So next time the child sees the actual fruit, she will remember to call it apple. There are more nouns that are uncommon than apple, however, and you will likely want to see images of these nouns to remember them. Thus, you may want to use a visual dictionary in this situation. The highly-recommended visual dictionaries that you can look for copies in your library or bookstores are: Merriam-Webster’s Visual Dictionary by Merriam-Webster (Oct 1, 2006) Ultimate Visual Dictionary...

101 Ways to Improve Your English – For Non-native Speakers

By on Sep 5, 2011 in Education, Language | 7 comments

Having English as a second language, I played kids vocabulary games, watched English TV shows with captions on, read English books aloud, and thought in English all day—all so I can be fluent in English. How hard can that goal be? Hard but fun! And as if those “hard-but-fun” activities are not enough to accomplish my goal, I created my own word games, made bike riding an educational activity, and tested myself on how many English words I could spell correctly in an hour. The last one sounds overboard, don’t you think? But I did it. Let’s say it was the product of too much enthusiasm (and free time?) Ha! That activity made me a better speller though and it is just one of a few examples of what you can do to improve your English too. In fact, at the end of this article is a 101 list of activity ideas, so be ready to fill your to-do lists and desks. No need to do all the activities listed...