Reah's Blog | Education, Language, Technology

Improving Your English Tip #3: Write Photo and Drawing Captions

By on Jan 17, 2013 in English Language | 4 comments

It has been proven many times that photos and illustrations help people remember things quickly and easily. So why not use the power of visuals in improving your English communication skills? How? Write English captions on photos and drawings you have! Start with your treasure box of old printed photos. You can write your captions lightly at the back of the photos. If it’s an event, try to remember when it was, what happened, and why that photo was taken. Who are in the photos? What are they doing? What are interesting objects did you notice in the photos? Answer these questions of course in English and write at the back of the photo paper. Other sources of photos are your family photo albums. The good thing about photo albums is the space provided to put descriptions on. If you don’t have many photos or drawings to write captions on, scour the internet for millions of them that other people have taken and drawn. Use these available masterpieces to practice on, which might actually turn out better as you don’t have emotional attachment to the work and your can write the English caption for the piece more objectively or creatively. Some sites where you can browse images are Flickr, Picasa Web Albums’ public photos, iStockphoto, and shutterstock. If you like to keep up with news worthy events, you will appreciate the editorial photos at gettyimages and describing these in English may really become a challenge for a non-native speaker. What about illustrations? Drawings? Of course you can also use these in this type of learning activity. Photos and illustrations represent real world objects, events, or thoughts. So it does not matter if you are practicing your English language with a photo or a drawing as long as you can describe what it represents in your own words in English. Check out devianART for artworks other people have created and describe how the artworks captivate you . Lastly, turn this English writing activity to a speech activity by finding a partner whom you can describe the photos and drawings...

A Language Barrier

By on Mar 23, 2012 in English Language | 6 comments

I was in a famous fastfood branch waiting for my cashier to serve the meal I ordered, when I overheard the old traveling Japanese man by the next cashier asking her “Is it OLD?”, referring to the coffee she was serving. His cashier, misunderstood OLD with COLD, and answered the Japanese, “HOT sir”. It wasn’t quiet at all by the counter and the cashier was away from her cash register getting a cup under the cabinet, so, the miscommunication was acceptable. The Japanese repeated himself, “NO, is it OLD?” and the Filipina answered back “HOT sir.” This second time was less acceptable. The Japanese asked again, so the Filipina moved back to her register and told the Japanese the coffee would be HOT. Frustrated with the cashier’s answer, the Japanese rephrased his question, “No, how long? WHEN?”. The cashier got more confused, and asked back, “WHEN?”. This time, I couldn’t kept watching and wanted to help the Japanese, so I told my cashier who was at that time trying to help her coworker, “Bago daw ba ung kape? (Is the coffee new?)”. Since this was an opposite odd translation, I corrected myself immediately, “Luma daw ba ang kape, matagal na daw ba? (Is the coffee old? Was it made a long time ago?)”, which were not the best translations either because I was trying to be literal and these weren’t how Filipinos would describe it in that context. So, the two Filipina cashiers got more confused with my translation. My cashier totally ignored me and started talking with her friend “Ano daw? When?”. Then just a few seconds later, we saw the Japanese customer retreating from the situation and walking out with his luggage but no hot coffee, while the two Filipina cashiers were mocking him as they thought his English wasn’t good. Unlike the Japanese customer, I walked away from the counter with my order on a tray, but walked away like him feeling frustrated with the situation. I could have helped sooner, translated better to my fellow Filipinas, and prevented them from mocking the Japanese. Witnessing this whole scene reminded me of what my American husband told me, “It’s amusing to see two non-native English speakers talk to each other in English.” But this one was the...

Use Images and Charts to Learn Descriptive Words

By on Sep 6, 2011 in Education, English Language | 6 comments

Growing up, I had a limited English word list to describe emotions, actions, or even people in certain ways. During the past three years, however, I’ve been adding new adjectives to my list more actively than before. One of the ways I’ve been doing to learn new adjectives is using images and charts. Back when I was in high school in the Philippines, I looked at a facial expression chart posted inside our guidance counselor’s office. Drawn in the chart were faces showing different emotions, and below each face was the English word to describe the expression. I didn’t think of learning words from the chart that time. I just thought it was creative and cool. Now, I think of it as a learning tool as well. Using the facial expression chart as a learning tool was probably the primary intention of the first person who created a chart like this. And it’s good that I found some charts online to show to you as examples. The first facial expression chart is from Bardsville. Take a look at the “big” adjectives used in the chart such as incredulous and despondent. The second facial expression chart, posted below, was created by Cedarseed to illustrate how to draw different faces. Cedarseed made it as a guide for artists, but it is also a very good chart to get familiarized with the faces and the words of facial expressions. The last image is not a facial expression chart but a screenshot taken from EnchantedLearning.com’s Adjectives page. Now, with the image samples displayed above, do you think it is easier to learn some adjectives using images with text rather than learning them from using words...

Use an English Visual Dictionary When Learning Nouns

By on Sep 5, 2011 in Education, English Language | 1 comment

When learning new English nouns—the words that refer to people, places, things, or ideas—a visual dictionary will help you retain the words in your mind effectively. It’s just like when a child learns what the word apple means, a parent will show the child an apple or an image of an apple to help the child create a mental image of an apple, which is usually a red fruit (sometimes it’s green!). So next time the child sees the actual fruit, she will remember to call it apple. There are more nouns that are uncommon than apple, however, and you will likely want to see images of these nouns to remember them. Thus, you may want to use a visual dictionary in this situation. The highly-recommended visual dictionaries that you can look for copies in your library or bookstores are: Merriam-Webster’s Visual Dictionary by Merriam-Webster (Oct 1, 2006) Ultimate Visual Dictionary by DK Publishing (Oct 31, 2011) One Million Things: A Visual Encyclopedia by Peter Chrisp (Jun 16, 2008) There is also an online visual dictionary from Merriam Webster, and you can access it here: http://visual.merriam-webster.com/. Their online dictionary has more than 6,000 images from different themes such as House, Arts, Clothing, and Society. I actually owned a children visual dictionary when I was around 8 years old. And I really enjoyed learning the English words by looking at the pictures. You can’t learn all the nouns conveniently from a visual dictionary though. The nouns that refer to ideas or concepts need more special attention; because in most cases, these nouns cannot be easily represented by one image and requires further explanation. Internet and freedom are two good examples of such nouns. A mind map, however, can do the trick to explain these...

101 Ways to Improve Your English – For Non-native Speakers

By on Sep 5, 2011 in Education, Language | 10 comments

Having English as a second language, I played kids vocabulary games, watched English TV shows with captions on, read English books aloud, and thought in English all day—all so I can be fluent in English. How hard can that goal be? Hard but fun! And as if those “hard-but-fun” activities are not enough to accomplish my goal, I created my own word games, made bike riding an educational activity, and tested myself on how many English words I could spell correctly in an hour. The last one sounds overboard, don’t you think? But I did it. Let’s say it was the product of too much enthusiasm (and free time?) Ha! That activity made me a better speller though and it is just one of a few examples of what you can do to improve your English too. In fact, at the end of this article is a 101 list of activity ideas, so be ready to fill your to-do lists and desks. No need to do all the activities listed at the end of the article. No rush too. Just pick out those that match your learning style, personality type, or level of proficiency. You can even just select the ones that use materials commonly found online, at home, at school, at work, or in the library. And if you want to do it with your family and friends, choose the activities that require interaction with other people. Now, enjoy reading the 101 activity ideas to improve your English and do not forget to take notes of those activities you want to do. For your convenience, you can download and print the pdf version of this article so you can write your notes on it. By using images and drawings 1Use an English visual dictionary to learn words referring to people, animals, places, and things. 2Use images to learn descriptive words. 3Take photos or draw scenes and items you see every day, then write their captions in English. 4 Label images indexed in Google Image search. 5 Use Google Translate and Google Images together to learn names of places and things. By using your first language 6 Keep and use English dictionary with you that translates to your first language. 7 Translate words, phrases, and sentences you always use in your first language. 8 Translate questions you commonly ask in your native language to English. 9 Translate your local TV shows to English at Viki.com. 10 Translate songs written on your native language to English. 11 Fill a jar with strips of paper containing random sentences written on your native language. Then once a day, draw a strip of paper from the jar and translate the sentence to English. By using real items 12 Learn new words from reading English texts printed in product labels or packaging. 13 Label things found in your house or in your office. 14 Hold or point to the actual item when you are describing it. By using videos 15 Watch English TV shows. 16 Watch English TV shows with English captions on. 17 Watch news from English-speaking news channels. 18 Watch English videos that teach you how to do things. 19 Watch movies and shows without English subtitles. 20 Watch free lectures that interest you at AcademicEarth.org. 21 Watch English video lessons online. 22 Watch free English documentaries online. By listening 23 Listen to English radio shows, commentaries, and advertising. 24 Listen to the correct pronunciations of words online. 25 Listen to English audio books, which you can probably find in your local libraries. 26 Listen to English podcasts. Through Lists 27 Master the 1000 most commonly used English words. 28 List and memorize new English words and phrases you think you will be comfortable using. 29 List and group words that are in any way related or similar to each other. Through music 30 Learn from singing popular English songs like those from the Beatles and Abba. 31 Sing English nursery songs. 32 Listen to songs made for teaching English grammar, punctuation, and spelling. Through games 33 Play Scrabble. 34 Play Boggle. 35 Answer English crossword puzzles. 36 Play word guessing games. 37 Play English typing games. 38 Choose English as the default language of computer games you play. By reading 39 Keep and use an English dictionary with you that has sample sentences. 40 Read English books and magazines regularly. 41 Read English webpages that write about topics that interest you. 42 Read book and product reviews in Amazon.com. 43 Read comments written by English native speakers online. 44 Take the meaning of the word from how it is used in the text you are reading. 45 Read blogs that publish tips on English usage, grammar, and vocabulary. By learning English patterns and word usage 46 Learn and master the basic patterns in English grammar. 47 Compare English grammar with that of your first language. 48 Learn the rules of parallelism and practice using it. 49 Learn how to use modifiers, and practice using them. 50 Learn how to use phrasal verbs and idioms, and practice using them. 51 Get any copy of the best grammar books. 52 Learn English spelling patterns. 53 Spell English words on paper or spell it out loud, over and over again. 54 Research and familiarize yourself with slang words and phrases. By speaking 55 Spend an hour reading English texts out loud. 56 Recite English words...

Change (Money): English to Filipino Sentences Translations

By on Jun 2, 2011 in Language | 1 comment

This is the first article in the series of English to Filipino sentence translations I will post in this blog. Subject: Change Subject’s Definition: The smaller denominations of money (like coins) that will be exchanged for same amount but with a bigger denomination of money (like a 100 bill). Corrected English to Filipino Online Translations English Sentence Correct translation Google’s Translation Do you have change? May barya ka ba? (Asking one person)  May barya ba kayo? (Asking several people) Mayroon ba kayong baguhin? Do you have change for this? May barya ka ba para dito? (Asking one person)  May barya ba kayo para dito? (Asking several people) Mayroon ba kayong baguhin para sa mga ito? I have change. Mayroon akong barya. Mayroon akong baguhin. I need change for my thousand peso bill. Kailangan ko ng barya para sa aking isang libong papel. Kailangan ko baguhin para sa aking libong peso bill. Do you have change for a thousand dollar bill? Mayroon ba kayong barya para sa isang libong pisong buo? Mayroon ba kayong baguhin para sa isang libong peso bill?   Subject: Change Subject’s Definition: The money returned to you as the balance of the amount you have paid for something. Corrected English to Filipino Online Translations English Sentence Correct translation Google’s Translation How much is the change? Magkano ang sukli? Magkano ang palitan ng? Did you get the right change? Nakuha mo ba ang tamang sukli? Alam mo makuha ang karapatan baguhin? Did you receive the exact change? Natanggap mo ba ang saktong sukli? Natanggap mo ba ang eksaktong baguhin? Can you give me my change? Pwede mo ba ibigay sa akin ang sukli ko? Maaari ba ninyo akong ang pagbabago? You gave me too much change. Binigyan mo ako ng sobrang sukli.  Sobra ang sukli mo sa akin. (common alternative) Iyong ibinigay sa akin ng masyadong maraming baguhin....